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Board Members

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Aaron Chapin

President
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Lt. Aaron Chapin is the Night Shift Patrol Lieutenant and PTO unit commander for the University of Wisconsin – Madison Police Department. Aaron has been with the UWPD for 15 years and has been assigned to the Field Services Division of the agency for the majority of his career. Aaron has served in the capacity of a Patrol Officer, Court Services Officer, Training Officer, Patrol Sergeant, Public Information Officer and is an instructor in numerous topics to include Firearms, Vehicle Contacts, Defense and Arrest Tactics and Emergency Vehicle Operations. Aaron completed the School of Police Staff and Command course through Northwestern University in November of 2013 and earned a BA in the Management of Criminal Justice from Concordia University Wisconsin (CUW) in October of 2014. He is currently pursuing a MS in Organizational Leadership and Administration with a certificate in Public Administration at CUW. Aaron plans to pursue a law degree or an MBA from the University of Wisconsin in the future.
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Michele Wyatt

1st Vice President
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Michele has been a member of the Virginia Beach Police Department since 1996 working most of her career in uniform patrol and Professional Development and Training. She became a Field Training Officer in 1999 and transitioned to Police Training Officer (PTO) after her completion of the PTO/PBL “Train the Trainer” course. She is one of three members of the Virginia Beach Police Department who were instrumental in the successful implementation of the PTO program into VBPD. Michele became a PTO instructor in 2005, and has since trained numerous officers from VBPD, as well as, various other agencies to be certified PTOs. Michele became a General Instructor in 2001, and continues to instruct academy recruits and veteran officers as both a General Instructor and a Defensive Tactics Instructor. She is currently assigned to Professional Development and Training as the Coordinating Sergeant in charge of post academy in-service training, leadership development, and the department’s PTO program. Michele is co-owner of Advanced Problem-Based Training Solutions, which offers PTO training and logistical consultation for outside agencies looking to transition into this training program. Michele is also continuing her education by actively pursuing her degree in Sociology from Saint Leo University.
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Paul LaFerriere

2nd Vice President
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Lt. Paul LaFerriere has over 31 years experience in law enforcement. He is currently the Commanding Officer of the day shift for the Lowell, Massachusetts Police Department, one of the original test sites that assisted in shaping the content of the PTO Program. He is a certified instructor in bothLegal Issues and PBL, with over 20 years of teaching experience. Besides his various duties with the Lowell Police Department, Paul is also a practicing attorney, having graduated from Suffolk University Law School in 1991.
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Malena Gonzalez

Secretary
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Malena is an Interactive Design Instructor for Assiniboine Community College (ACC) in Brandon, MB, Canada. In this job, she acquired her Level I – III PSPBL certification and has helped implement the Problem Based Learning (PBL) methodology in the program that she currently teaches. Experimenting with PBL has helped demonstrate that the PBL philosophy can be implemented in any organization from any type of background. Currently, in collaboration with the students, is helping provide web-based solutions to non-profit organizations around the world, following the PBL methodology. The current PSPBL website was done under her supervision as part of a PBL based course in the Interactive Media Arts Program at ACC.
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Roger Buhlis

Treasurer
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Roger Buhlis retired from the Richmond Police Department in 2012 after 26 years of police service. During his career Roger worked as a Patrol Officer, CSI, Training Officer, Recruit Training Officer for the Napa Police Academy, and Traffic Enforcement (Motor) Officer. As an officer, Roger worked to implement the PBL PTO model at Richmond PD and served as the program coordinator. He was promoted to Sergeant in 2006 and, at various times worked as the Adjutant to four Patrol Bureau commanders, supervised patrol teams, the jail, the Police Training Program, and served as a Professional Standards investigator.Roger graduated from the pilot PBL Instructor Certification course, the California POST Master Instructor Development Program, and the Supervisory Leadership Institute (SLI). He now facilitates SLI courses in his retirement. Roger recently graduated from San Francisco State University with a Masters degree in Adult Education. He is currently the President of the Police Society for Problem Based Learning.
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Gerry Cleveland

Co-Chair
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Gerry Cleveland is the past president and co-founder of PSPBL. He is, with Professor Greg Saville, the co author of the National Police Training Officer (PTO) program and the National Police PBL Model. Gerry has been working for the past two decades with police agencies around the world to improve police training standards. Gerry lives in Australia with his wife. He is an educator and a lawyer. He currently lives in Perth, Australia where he teaches at Notre Dame University Law School. When he is not travelling and teaching, Gerry practices commercial credit law and criminal law. Gerry began his professional life as a police officer in Toronto where he spent ten years working in a variety of functions including street patrol and undercover drug work.
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Greg Saville

Co-Chair
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I had no idea I was getting into something that would change my professional life. My original involvement with problem-based learning (PBL) began in the 1980s during Graduate School when I was first exposed to self-directed learning. York University was committed to helping students develop their own plan of study. Accompanying this flexible curriculum was responsibility for mastering my field of study. I was expected to present my ever-changing work every 6 months and then defend this in front of a committee of professors. There’s nothing like pressure performance to bring out the best in students, at least in this one.At the time I was a police officer teaching self-defense to police officers. I was struck by their many different learning styles. Though the techniques we taught were typical defensive tactics training, each officer learned these things in different ways. Some responded to verbal instructions, others to demonstrations, and yet others to written directions. Adult learning was not as simple as giving a lecture and expecting results. That’s just not how people learn.Two other places where I used adult learning was teaching crime prevention through environmental design and problem-oriented policing. In both courses we use extensive group work and field projects. Since I began in 1989, these methods had always been the most popular and effective parts of the program. The other time I saw adult learning take hold was from 1993 to 1998 when I was national advisor in problem-oriented policing to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. I taught the RCMP instructional staff at their national training academy. POP was a large shift back then for the RCMP and before long the training staff realized new methods were required in their basic recruit academy. Transformation began shortly after and today they lead the police world in academy training methods.By the time I began teaching at Florida State University in 1998, my own personal shift to adult learning and PBL was already well underway. Unfortunately my experience with university teaching, and police instruction, was rather sad. Most of it is characterized by teachers lecturing at students. The “sage on the stage” left little room for self-directed learning or, in some cases, any learning at all. That was when Gerry Cleveland and I began discussing adult learning and PBL. He described how he had been using these methods in his high school teaching and how I could use them with my university students. I decided to give it a try.My colleagues at Florida State warned me about “tampering” with traditional lectures, especially since I was assigned over 250 criminology students to teach in two different classes. They told me using groups and having the students teach each other would never work. They were wrong! Not only did it work far better than the traditional lecturing system, my students flourished. The administration staff kept asking me why so many students were lining up to take these particular classes. My students told me they were actually learning the material and retaining it after they took the final exams. Many indicated they would remember this class for a long time to come. Will I someday return to a strict lecture format without determining whether that is how my students actually learn? In my view that is neither an ethical nor effective way to teach students. I will never go back.By 1990, Gerry Cleveland and I had developed our ideas on how to more fully integrate PBL into policing. Luckily we soon had the opportunity to try them out. Deputy Chief Ron Glensor from the Reno Police called me and indicated that Reno Police had obtained funding from the COPS office for a research project on field training. Chief Jerry Hoover and he had launched a national program to update the traditional San Jose model of field training. Were we interested in participating? I mentioned the PBL method to Ron and he indicated he thought this might be just the approach that could work in police field training.Now we have a new national PTO model, an international PSPBL society, and this website. It’s funny how things can change so quickly when the time is right. If there is anything I’ve learned in the past few years clearly, the time is right for moving forward in policing.
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Lawrence Greinke

Board Member
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Sgt. Lawrence Greinke Originally from Mount Prospect, Illinois, CO SGT Greinke served in the United States Army and after 23 years retired as a First Sergeant (1SG) in the Military Police Corps. He and his wife Myong have a son and daughter who live in Overland Park, Kansas, and Winston-Salem, North Carolina, respectively.CO SGT Greinke began his career as a Corrections Officer at the Riley County Police Department in Manhattan, Kansas in August of 1998. In November 1999, he was promoted to Corrections Sergeant. During his tenure with the Department, CO SGT Greinke was responsible for establishing the jail key control system within the jail of the new Riley County Law Enforcement Center in 2001, inmate classification supervisor, and is still responsible for the forecasting and requisition of jail supplies. He is currently the Corrections Training Officer Coordinator (CTC) for the Jail Division while simultaneously a shift supervisor in the Jail on Watch 3.In 2007 he was the first ever jail recipient to be awarded Supervisor of the Year for the Riley County Police Department, and again in 2012, he was the first ever jail recipient to be presented with the Director’s Award. CO SGT Greinke is a member of the Kansas Jail Association and in Feb 2016 was elected to represent the North East region of the state and serves as an instructor for the Kansas Jail Association’s “Basic Jail Academy” and “1st Line Supervisor’s Course”. He is a Level III Instructor for the Police Society for Problem-Based Learning. He is the only Correctional Officer in PS-PBL to achieve this level. His goals are to continue representing the PS-PBL in the area of Corrections, become the first Level IV Instructor representing Corrections, as well as, establish effective communications between all entities associated with the operation of County Jails, via the Kansas Jail Association. Finally, to fully support the Department’s Mission Statement “To Reduce Crime and Enhance the Quality of Life for the Citizens Which We Serve”.
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Scott Hajek

Board Member
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SCOTT HAJEKRiley County (KS) Police DepartmentScott has been a member of the Riley County Police Department since 2001. In 2005 Scott attended the PBL Certification course and worked with others in 2006 to implement the PTO program at the Riley County Police Department. He acted as a PTO until 2008 when he became a detective. In 2010 he was promoted to Sergeant and returned to Patrol, where he has acted as a PTO Supervisor. Since 2006 Scott has facilitated several PTO courses. Scott has a Bachelor of Arts degree in Sociology from Kansas State University.
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Wayne Jacobsen

Board Member
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WAYNE JACOBSENserved with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police for twenty-three years where he conducted uniformed patrol duties, under-cover operations, and was as detachment commander during his final five years. After leaving the RCMP, he spent one year as the security manager at the Royal Canadian Mint in Winnipeg, Manitoba. After leaving the Mint, Wayne was engaged by Assiniboine Community to work in partnership with the Brandon Police Service in order to develop the Police Studies program. This program is recognized by the Department of Justice within the Province of Manitoba as being police officer recruit training. While in the RCMP, Wayne completed a Bachelor of Commerce Degree and in 2015, he obtained a Master of Education degree from Brandon University.
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Nick Schneider

Board Member
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NICK SCHNEIDERSince joining the Durham Police Department in 2001, Nick Schneider has served as an Officer, as a Patrol Corporal and as a Patrol Sergeant in the Uniform Patrol Division. He has held numerous other assignments including Gang Unit Investigator, Intelligence Unit Investigator, and a Selective Enforcement Team Member/Sniper in the Special Operations Division. In November of 2008, he was asked to go to the Training Division as a Corporal to implement the PTO Program and run the day to day operation. He also coordinated the Advanced Law Enforcement Training (ALET) Academy. After being promoted to Sergeant and spending seven months on Patrol, he was selected to return to the Training Division. He is currently is the lead Police Training Officer (PTO) Program Instructor, leads the Firearms Training Program/Range, the Rapid Deployment/Active Shooter Response Program, and the Mobile Field Force. He specializes in the following disciplines: Police Training Officer Program/Problem-Based Learning, Specialized Firearms, Patrol Rifle/Urban Rifle, Active Shooter/Rapid Deployment, Subject Control/Arrest Techniques, Chemical Munitions, Less-Lethal Munitions, Diversionary Devices & National Incident Management System (NIMS), Taser, Simunitions, and is a participant of the IALEFI Master Instructor Development Program.
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Parry D'Orio

Board Member
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Parry has been with the Virginia Beach Police Department since 2010. Positions held are Patrol, Diversity Recruiter, and PTO Coordinator. She was trained in PTO during field training and became a PTO in 2013. Parry became a General Instructor and CPR/First Aid instructor in 2015. Parry instructs academy recruits in PBL, PTO, CPR/AED and officers in PTO school and annual in-service. She is currently assigned to Professional Development and Training as the PTO Coordinator. Parry earned a Bachelor of Science in Sociology from Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia and has pursued a Master’s in Public Health from Walden University.
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The Police Society for Problem Based Learning
PO Box 362  Oakley, California, USA  94561
Email us: info@pspbl.org